Thanks Adam!

WordPress 4.7 was just released and it marks the sixth release in a row that I have been lucky enough to contribute to.

Contributing to WordPress core has always been a personal goal for me and while I had made attempts in the past, it wasn’t until I joined 10up that I was finally able to contribute back to the open source project that pays my bills.

Contributing to WordPress Core is not hard in and of itself but what can be hard is the ramp up. WordPress is 13 years old, that’s a lot of project history to grok! Besides that, there is trac and the technical side that a new contributor has to figure out before they can even get to place to start writing code.

Having someone to help you navigate the waters of WordPress core contribution is invaluable. For me, that person was ( and still is ) Adam Silverstein, a friend,  and fellow 10upper. Without his help, guidance and patience, I would probably still be trying to figure out how to get someone to look at my tickets 🙂

Adam was recently given commit access to WordPress Core and I wanted to congratulate and thank him for everything he has done for me personally and for the larger WordPress community.

 

Should we trust WordPress Core translations?

A while ago I was working on a patch to refresh the code for the default widgets that are included with WordPress Core. One of the changes made was to replace the i18n methods currently in-place with their counterparts that escape and translate the output. This is a pretty common practice as translation files can be a potential attack vector for hackers. WordPress.com VIP will usually request that this is added to any strings being translated and it is part of the 10up best practices. Continue reading “Should we trust WordPress Core translations?”